Original Map of Czaslavium vulgo Czasla Bohemiae Civitas; Civitates Orbis Terrarum. Georg. Hogenberg Braun, Franz.
Original Map of Czaslavium vulgo Czasla Bohemiae Civitas; Civitates Orbis Terrarum
Original Map of Czaslavium vulgo Czasla Bohemiae Civitas; Civitates Orbis Terrarum

Original Map of Czaslavium vulgo Czasla Bohemiae Civitas; Civitates Orbis Terrarum

Cologne: Braun & Hogenberg, 1617. First edition. Matted in Rag Board. A Fine original copperplate engraved map of Czaslavium: Leipzig and Prague executed in rich original period hand-coloring. Folio (20.5 x 15.75 in.) Center fold. Minor edge wear. Archival matting.
A fine bird's-eye perspective of the cities and surrounding topography of Leipzig and Prague engraved by Franz Hogenberg (1535-1590) after drawings by Georg (Joris) Hoefnagel (1545–1600) a Flemish painter, and his son Jacob Hoefnagel (1575-1630). A fine period work not only as a detailed topographical map of two important centers of artistic and intellectual activity, but as a pictorial document of landmark military achievements as well as elements of travel, costume and folk culture.

A richly colored view of two hilltop perspectives divided by an ornamental band with a legend and explanatory text set within framework. In the upper half The Road to Leipzig, and in the lower half The Road to Prague. The lower section depicts a picturesque view of the hillside as peasant folk travelers in local dress follow a man on horse and cart en-route to Leipzig. Upper Prague. A framed life-sized portrait of the Johannes Zizkae- the one-eyed Military General shown in effigy is nailed to a tree. On a hill overlooking Prague (perhaps to commemorate the Battle of Vitkov Hill) two soldiers and a peasant -whose walking staff has been replaced by a spiked weapon - stand beside the tomb of Zizkae which reads A. 1424 die jouis ante Joannes Siska.

Johannes Zizkae (c. 1360 -1424) was an honored Czech general, and an innovative military leader who became a national folk hero by arming and training the peasant folk to become soldiers using innovative and revolutionary military tactics. Furthermore, according to Georg Braun's introduction in Book One of Civitates orbis terrarum, the vignettes showing common folk in the foregrounds of his city plans were possibly included to keep the Turkish from studying these topographically accurate perspectives of important cities and places of cultural interest for their military gain due to the fact that their religion prohibited the Turks from gazing upon the human form. Fine. Item #6986

Price: $2,800.00

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